Tuesday, 18 June 2013

Something a lot more orc...

A while ago I posted up some figures related to some rules (provisionally entitled 'Warband') I've been working on for a while.

Well, having been mired play-testing for a few months, and of course the usual variety of other projects, distractions, and the petty annoyances of 'real life' this week I finally finished the first of the armies.

These rules use 100x50mm bases with 10mm figures - in this case almost entirely Pendraken's excellent fantasy orcs.

I'll let the photos do most of the rest of the work.

Here's the army in all it's glory.



The army commander with his command advisors (or what passes for such in an orc army) and his persona shamans casting some defensive spells and oracles.



The army's shamanic council crackling with blue magical energy.




Wolf riders ready to scout ahead of the horde.




Boar riders!  Perhaps the orc general's kinfolk or nobles?




Archers with (very) short bows.





And a series of warrior units, with a variety of weapons.  First up the halberdiers ready to deal out some pain, bring down enemy horsemen and chop their way through heavy armour.



Then some warriors with mixed weapons - the bulk of most orc armies.



To make recording hits more tidy I've used Minibits excellent 'dice herder' dice frames.



The shamans have managed to conjure up a variety of unpleasant looking creatures to fight for the orc commander. 


And finally, a staggering mob of ogres and giants that fight for the orcs in return for first pickings when it comes to eating the enemy dead.  The center figure is an ancient Citadel troll I had languishing in a box somewhere looking for something to do...



Next up...the dwarves to take these chaps on.





Friday, 7 June 2013

Dux Bellorum: A Very British Civil War


We've been playing A Very British Civil War for a few years now and frankly we've never really found a set of rules that we like for the period; so much so that we put together a homebrewed set that ultimately fell over in typical Heath Robinson style.

Recently we've also been playing a good deal of Dan Mersey's excellent Dux Bellorum, mostly using the Wars of the Roses conversion I cobbled together (see here) and were very much enjoying these.

After a bit of a hiatus we dug out Lord Lambton's chaps and my Chopwell Communists for another bash and came across the same old problem - rules.  We've played and discounted (as 'not for us' or 'not right for AVBCW') a whole slew of rules (Bolt Action, Force on Force, IABSM, Rules of Engagment, Legends of the Old West, etc.)

Then in a casual chat I said, 'hang on chaps, how about a Dux Bellorum conversion'?  Frankly none of us thought it would work, but I bolted together some old material I had lurking in a few 'to be deleted' files, ran them through the Dux Bellorum engine and came up with a proposed set.  We've played them in anger, tweaked than, and...well...what can I say?

Dan Mersey appears to be a genius!  His Dark Ages rules work just as well for tactical skirmishing in 1939,

So I thought i'd post up the rules we've been using so far for your consideration.  Enjoy!  And please let me know what you think, especially if you use these amendments in anger (you'll need a copy of Dux Bellorum of course - a purchase you won't regret i'd imagine!)


Unit type
Figs
MV
BRV
MELEE
SHOOT
PRO
COH
PTS
Notes
Commanders









On foot
1-5
6”
9
4(1)
3
6
6
5
Inspiring
Mounted
1-5
12”
9
5
3
5
6
5
Inspiring
Demagogue
1-5
6”
9
2
2
5
6
4
Motivating
Infantry









Regulars
8-10
6”
8
4(1)
6
5
5
5
-
Irregulars
8-10
6”
7
3(1)
5
5
5
4
-
Militia
8-10
6”
6
2
4
5
4
3
-
Cavalry









Regulars
5-6
12”
8
5
1
4
4
4
-
Irregulars
5-6
12”
7
4
1
4
4
3
-
Mounted infantry
5-6
12”
7
2
3
4
4
3
-
Support teams









LMG
2-3
6”
7
2
4
5
3
3
-
HMG
2-3
3”
6
1
5(1)
4
3
3
-
AT Rifle
2
3”
7
1
1(2)
5
3
3
-
Spotter
1-2
6”
9
1
1
5
2
3
Spot
Sniper
1-2
6”
9
1
4
6
2
5
Sniper
Flamethrower
1-2
6”
7
1
8(1): 12”
4
2
3
-
Mortar
3-4
3”
6
1
4(1): ≥12”
4
2
3
Indirect
Mortar, heavy
4-7
3”
6
1
5(1): ≥12”
4
2
3 4
Indirect
Field gun
3-4
2”
6
1
6(2)
4
3
3
-
Field gun, heavy
5-7
2”
6
1
7(3)
4
3
4
-
Fighting dogs
3-6
6”
9
6
-
4
3
4
Assault
Logistics teams









Supply
3-5
6”
9
1
-
4
4
3
Supply
Medical
1-5
6”
9
1
-
4
4
3
Medic

Rules amendments

Basing
Figures in units are usually based individually.  A unit must have a clear ‘leader’ figure (typically a suitably impressive hero type, flag bearer, main gunner, or similar easily identifiable figure).  All figures in a unit must remain within 3” of this central figure.  Figures from different units must not ‘intermix’.

Each unit has a forward facing edge, which should be represented by placing the figures clearly pointing in that direction.

Deployment
At the start of the battle, each side alternately deploys 3 units (of any type) at a time.

Turn sequence
Each proceeds as follows.
1. Alternately place LPs (Repeller goes first)
2. Missile fire (Simultaneous outcomes.  Reduce unit Cohesion as required)
3. Move units (Only if unit did not shoot:  In sequence.  Test Bravery for each unit)
4. Close combat (Simultaneous outcomes.  Reduce unit Cohesion as required)
5. Check morale & victory (Reduce LPs if necessary, and return all unused LPs to players)

Movement
All units count as skirmishers.  Vehicles can interpenetrate any friendly and enemy unit, but do not count as skirmishers.


Figures from different units must not ‘intermix’ at the end of any move.  Units must be placed so that they are clearly distinct from each other.

Movement sequence; Units move in the following sequence.
1.       Aggressor’s Vehicles          (inc. Tank Commanders)
2.       Repeller’s Vehicles             (inc. Tank Commanders)
3.       Aggressor’s Cavalry           (inc. Mounted Commanders)
4.       Repeller’s Cavalry               (inc. Mounted Commanders)
5.       Aggressor’s Infantry            (inc. Commanders)
6.       Repeller’s Infantry               (inc. Commanders)
7.       Aggressor’s Teams

8.       Repeller’s Teams

Movement and shooting; A unit or vehicle cannot move if it shoots this turn

Obstacles and terrain; A unit stops and ends its move if it meets a linear obstacle that it did not begin in contact with.  It stops upon entering area terrain (e.g. woodland or a building).

Suppression; A unit that suffers at least 2 lost Cohesion points from shooting this turn automatically goes (or stays) prone this turn as its move.  No Bravery test is required for this.

While suppressed a unit;

  • Remains prone and cannot move
  • Suffers -2 BRV
  • Suffers -2 SHOOT
  • If the unit is a commander or Demagogue it does not generate or distribute Leadership Points.  LPs already distributed this turn can still be used.

A suppressed unit remains suppressed until it succeeds a BRV test to move (even if it doesn’t act on that movement).

Units that cannot go prone (Mounted Commanders, Cavalry, Mortar, Field gun, or Flamethrower teams), still suffer all suppression effects, but do not go prone.

Vehicles are never suppressed by enemy shooting.

Going prone; Instead of moving, a unit (except Mounted Commanders, Cavalry, Mortar, Field gun, or Flamethrower teams) can go prone making it harder to hit with shooting if it's in the open.  A prone unit can get up and move normally in later turns.

Group moves; There are no group moves.  At the appropriate movement phase, all units move as individuals.

Bravery extremes; A unit's bravery test that rolls double 1 (before modifiers) allows the unit to move twice; these are two consecutive normal moves.  A unit that rolls double six (before modifiers) cannot move and loses 1 Cohesion. 

Shooting
Shoot ratings give the unit’s effect against soft targets (most units and vehicles). 
Where there is a second rating in brackets, this is the unit’s Shoot rating against hard targets (armoured vehicles, bunkers, buildings, etc.) 
Where a distance is listed, this shoot rating has a limited range, otherwise the range is unlimited.  A unit’s shooting arc is 45° to its front.  Vehicle weapons may shoot into one or more of four 45° arcs (front, left, right, rear).

Blocked line of sight; A unit’s line of sight is measured from its leader figure to any part/figure in the target unit.  This LOS is blocked if this LOS;
  • Passes within 1” of a friendly unit
  • Meets a linear obstacle or similar terrain (e.g. a hedge)
  • Passes through more than 3” of area terrain (e.g. a woodland)
Target priority; A unit must shoot at the closest enemy unit within 12” (or choose where two or more are equally close).  Otherwise a unit may shoot at any visible enemy target within arc and range.  A unit may not shoot at Medical or Supply team units if it has another enemy unit as a viable target.

Low on ammo; A unit that makes a shooting attack and rolls more ‘1’s’ than successful hits becomes ‘low on ammo’.
A unit that is low on ammo rolls half its Shooting dice (round down).  This applies to all weapons and both soft and hard target dice for the unit.
A unit that suffers a second ‘low on ammo’ result can no longer shoot (but can still fight in melee).

Shooting modifiers
-1*    Target unit is prone, in terrain, behind a ‘soft’ obstacle (fence, hedge, etc.), or obscurement (e.g. smoke)
-2    Target unit is behind a ‘hard’ obstacle (wall etc.), or fortified (in a trench, house, or similar).

*Does not apply against Indirect fire


Melee 
Melee ratings give the unit’s effect against soft targets (most units and vehicles).  Where there is a second rating in brackets, this is the unit’s Melee rating against hard targets (armoured vehicles, bunkers, buildings, etc.)

Fall back; Any unit that suffers more COH loss than all opponents it fought against falls back from melee.  It retreats the minimum distance to be more than 6” from all enemy units.

Pursuit; Any unit that won a melee may choose to pursue a retreating enemy.  It moves into contact with that enemy unit, and both remain locked in melee.  They fight again next turn.

Melee modifiers
+1   Unit charged into contact this turn, or pursued into contact last turn
+2   Attacking a unit’s flank (anywhere outside its firing arc)
-1    Opponent unit is in terrain, or beyond an obstacle

Special Rules
Each unit may purchase one or more special rules.  Unless specified as an ‘army rule’, the points cost is per unit. 
A unit cannot be given special rules that will reduce its cost below 2 points, or that will increase its cost above 7 points. 

Equipment
Equipment must be represented appropriately by having a few or all figures in the unit so equipped.  For example, an Infantry: Militia unit upgraded with bicycles and bombs, should include 1-2 figures with Molotov cocktails and perhaps 2-3 chaps on bicycles.

Armour        @ 2 points
Improvised armour plates or older armour looted from the collections of museums or country manors.  The unit gains +1 Protection but suffers -1” move.

Banner         @ 1 point (any Commander, Infantry or Cavalry units only)
The unit includes a fighter with banner, flag, or other inspiring icon.  The unit gains +1 BRV.

Bayonets     @ 1 point (any Commander, Infantry or Cavalry units only)
The unit is armed with bayonets, swords, or other proper melee weapons.  The unit gains +1 MELEE.

Bombs         @ 1 point (Foot Commander, or any Infantry units only)
The unit is armed with hand bombs, grenades, Molotov Cocktails, improvised thrown explosives, or similar weapons.  The unit gains +1(+1) SHOOT within 12”.

Bicycles       @ 1 point (Foot Commander, any Infantry, Supply or Medical units only)
The unit is given bicycles to get about quicker.  The unit can move 12” on roads or off road in good going.

Indirect        @ 0 points (Mortar units only)
The unit can shoot at any enemy unit it can see.  Alternately, it can shoot at any enemy unit that a friendly unit with the ‘Spot’ special unit ability can see, provided there is a clear line of communication between that friendly ‘spotter’ unit and the unit making the indirect shot.  This line of communication will be blocked if it must deviate to avoid impassable terrain, enemy units, or an area clearly inaccessible or difficult for a signals runner to cross.  An indirect shot ignores intervening terrain or other sight-blocking conditions, and counts all targets in light cover as ‘in the open’.  Weapons with indirect fire have a minimum range and cannot shoot at targets even partly within this range.

Mixed weapons  @ -1 point (any Commander, Infantry or Cavalry units only)
The unit is armed with a variety of mixed civilian grade weapons, pistols, and fowling pieces, improvised, poorly maintained or antique weapons.  The unit has its Shooting range limited to 18”.

Poorly supplied        @ -1 points
The unit has a poor supply of arms and ammunition.  It runs ‘low on ammo’ if any shooting attack dice rolls a ‘1’.

SMGs           @ 1 point (any Commander, Infantry, or Cavalry units only)
The unit includes some fighters with SMGs, pistols, short barrel shotguns and similar ‘assault’ weapons.  The unit gains +1 MELEE and +1 SHOOT (12”).  This bonus is permanently lost once the unit becomes ‘low on ammo’.

Smoke bombs           @ 1 point (any Commander, Infantry, Mortar, or Field gun units only)
The unit can lob smoke bombs or fire smoke shells to obscure the enemy and protect its friends while moving about.  Mortar and Field gun units can place a smoke marker anywhere in range.  Other units can place one anywhere within 6”.  The unit has enough smoke bombs/shells for one shot.  Once placed, at the end of each turn, the smoke drifts in the direction of the wind by 1d6-1” (it dissipates on a modified result of ‘1’ or less).

Squad LMG @ 1 point (any Foot Commander or Infantry units only)
The unit includes a fighter with an LMG.  The unit gains +1 SHOOT.

Well supplied            @ +1 points
The unit has a good supply of arms and ammunition.  It only runs ‘low on ammo’ if all shooting attack dice roll a ‘1’.

Wrecking tools          @ 1 point (and Foot Commander or Infantry units only)
The unit is armed with crow bars, fire blankets, sticky bombs, or similar weapons designed to attack armoured vehicles or other hard targets.  The unit gains +0 (+1) MELEE against tanks, bunkers and so on.


Unit Abilities
Unit abilities should be represented where appropriate.

Ambush       @ 2 points (any Foot Commander, Infantry or Support Team units only)
This unit is not deployed as normal.  Instead on your first turn, as its move, the unit is deployed anywhere in play but no closer than 12” to any enemy unit.

Assault troops   @ 1 point
The unit is trained to get into close combat with the enemy.  The unit is Impetuous; it does not need to make a Bravery test for a move that will end in contact with an enemy unit.

Brittle           @ -1 point (any unit with Bravery 7 or more)
The unit’s morale is fine when things are going well, but when the tide of battle turns, the unit is likely to slink away and ‘live to fight another day’.  The unit’s Bravery is 6 when taking break tests.

Fearless       @ 1 point
This unit is fearless in the face of enemy action and their own losses.  The unit can choose to ignore any suppression result that it suffers.

First Aid       @ 0 points (Medical units only)
Any friendly Commander, Infantry, Cavalry, or Support unit with 12” of a Medical unit and not within 12” of an enemy unit can restore 1 Cohesion point during the end phase provided they did not lose any Cohesion this turn.  Only a single unit can gain this benefit from the Medical unit in a turn. Units with the First aid ability cannot be given any further special rules.

Inspiring      @ 0 points (Commander units only)
All friendly units within 12” of the Commander’s ‘unit leader’ figure may use the Commander’s Bravery rating.  The Inspiring unit has 6 Leadership Points that may be given to any friendly unit under its command within 24”.  The Inspiring unit loses 1 LP for each unit under its command that is destroyed.

Loyal     @ 1 point
See p 53.  Choose any single non-vehicle unit.

Mad minute @ 1 point (any Infantry unit only)
This unit is trained to conduct the famed ‘mad minute’, giving rapid and accurate rifle fire.  The unit gains +2 SHOOT and automatically suffers ‘out of ammo’ as a result.

Motivating   @ 0 points (Demagogue units only)
The Motivating unit has 2 Leadership Points that may be given to any friendly unit within 12”.  These extra LPs are only lost if the Motivating unit is lost.  You can never assign LPs to a Motivating unit.

Sneaky         @ 1 point (any Infantry units only)
The unit cannot be seen or shot at beyond 18”, except by a sniper or an indirect weapon.

Sniper          @ 0 points (Sniper unit only)
A sniper can shoot at any visible enemy target in range; he is not compelled to shoot at the closest within 12”.  The sniper can ignore and shoot through closer enemy units to select a unit further away, picking off leaders, support units, and so on.

Spot @ 0 points (Spotter unit only), or @ +1 point (for Commander units), and +1 point for radios.
A unit with Spot allows off table support or any friendly units to use indirect fire to shoot at any enemy unit the spotter can see.  If the Commander or Spotter unit is also equipped with radios, any indirect fire unit will also have them and will always have a mutual line of communication.  See Special rules, Equipment, Indirect for further details.  

Supply         @ 0 points (Supply units only)
Any friendly Commander, Infantry, Cavalry, or Support unit with 12” of a Supply unit can remove all ‘out of ammo’ counters during the end phase.  Only a single unit can gain this benefit from the Supply unit in a turn.  Units with the Supply ability cannot be given any further special rules.

Trench rats         @ 1 point (any Foot Commander, Infantry or Support Team units only)
The unit is trained or skilled at defensive actions.  If this unit is benefitting from soft or hard obstacle cover a shooting unit loses an additional -1 modifier.

Army bonuses

Assassination    @ 4 points (army rule)
See p 50. 

Off table support      @ 1, 2, 3, or 4 points (army rule)
The force has the benefit of off table mortars or artillery as close support.  Instead of shooting, a Commander unit or Spotter unit can call in the off table support to attack an enemy unit.  The cost of support is as follows:
1 point per two shots    =     Smoke bomb
1 point per shot  =     SHOOT 4 (1) Indirect
2 points per shot  =     SHOOT 5 (1) Indirect
3 points per shot  =     SHOOT 6 (2) Indirect
4 points per shot  =     SHOOT 7 (2) Indirect


Subterfuge  @ 4 points (army rule)
The army has spies spreading misinformation in the enemy camp, or deep coffers with enough cash to buy off less keen enemies. Before either army deploys, select an enemy unit to target with subterfuge.  Roll 1d6-1; the targeted unit reduces its Cohesion by this much before the battle.  If its Cohesion is reduced to zero, the unit does not arrive for the battle and cannot be deployed.  It does not count as a lost unit for Morale or victory conditions; the army simply starts with one fewer units than expected.  Commander and Loyal units cannot be targeted by Subterfuge.

Swift deployment      @ 2 points (army rule)
See p 54. 

Taunts and Insults    @ 3 points (army rule)
The actions of the King and That Woman have created deep and personal divisions across Britain.  Taunting and hurled insults can enrage troops to take rash actions.  Once per battle at the start of any turn and after LPs have been placed choose one of your units.  All enemy units within 12” of this unit become Impetuous for that turn only.


Unit Descriptions

Commanders
Commanders are the leaders, the jolly good chaps, dastardly cads, bluff old army officers and firebrands of the Civil War.  They are the men (and militant sort of women) that the fighters look up to and follow into battle.  Most commanders will have a coterie of friends, advisors, batmen, hangers on, guards, and communications specialists that they take into battle.  Some ride to war in the old style, a method of fighting popular with the landed gentry and horsey types who still think the upper crust need to show a stiff upper lip in front of the lower orders.

Demagogues
These are Christian Priests, Communist Commissars, Fascist iconoclasts, local rabble rousers, and similar inspirational chaps brought along to bless the battle.  They are able to motivate the troops near them with rousing sermons, inspiring anthems, threats and promises. 

Infantry: Regulars
Infantry are the mainstay of all forces in the Civil War.  Regulars are well trained, skilled and motivated troops, typified by the various factions of the regular military, BUF legionaries, or units populated by WWI veterans and other disciplined fighters.  They often wear uniforms, and are well equipped and supplied.  Most have SMLEs or similar modern bolt action rifles, bayonets or similar close combat weapons, and have access to good stores of ammunition, water, food, and so on.

Infantry: Irregulars
Irregulars form the majority of most factions fighting strength.  They are often permanently constituted and given training (although usually ad hoc) and an esprit de corps.  Irregulars are armed with the best weapons they can find, typically a mix of modern bolt action rifles and older or civilian patterns.  They may have rough uniforms, or perhaps wear similar clothing by general agreement, as well as identifying armbands.

Infantry: Militia
Militia are levied, impressed, or drawn from civil volunteers.  Given little more than basic drill and simple instructions concerning how their weapons work, the Militia are poorly armed and equipped, often bringing their own civilian firearms.  Many Militia units are only partly armed, with perhaps half having rifles and the rest armed with spears or hand weapons.  Militia are useful for garrison duties, scouting, border patrols, and foraging but struggle to hold their own in actual fighting.

Cavalry: Regulars
Some commanders make use of ‘cavalry’.  Most horses are engaged in industry, but those with access to stables of riding horses (such as the various hunts) often take advantage to put on a splendid show.  Vulnerable to modern weapons, there is something undoubtedly marvellous about a cavalry charge and indeed the sword, axe, or lance armed riders can sweep away fragile enemies.  Regular cavalry are typically well trained, skilled, and motivated troops drawn from military service or exceptional huntsmen.  They are usually armed with lance or cavalry sword and are dedicated to the charge.

Cavalry: Irregulars
Irregular cavalry lack the training or discipline of their regular cousins, although they still offer a fast moving strike force to the commander.  Irregulars are usually drawn from rural communities, casual hunts or other regular riders.  They are armed with hand weapons, pistols or similar short ranged weapons but like the regular cavalry prefer the sweep of a mounted charge.

Cavalry: Mounted Infantry
Mounted infantry use horses for mobility, but generally dismount to fight with rifles or ranged weapons like common infantry. 

Support team: LMG
Light machine gun teams are formed separately to the more usual practice of integrating the LMG into an infantry unit.  they are useful in this role for providing fire support that can keep up with the infantry as it advances.

Support team: HMG
Heavy machineguns are the primary infantry fire support weapon, and the WWI veterans and old soldiers that often join local defence volunteer units will remember these horrifying weapons with dread.  A well dug in HMG team can halt an entire advance.  They are however, heavy pieces of kit that are difficult to manoeuvre.

Support team: AT Rifle
With the advent of armoured vehicles the need for the infantry to take out these beasts has been met by the anti-tank rifle.  Large, heavy and cumbersome, they are none-the-less effective at piercing most hard target armour.

Support team: Sniper
A sniper and his spotter are a much feared and lethal aspect of the modern battlefield.  With a large number of poachers, gamekeepers, ex-soldiers and other marksmen joining up, snipers are an ever present danger.

Support team: Spotter 

Those forces lucky enough to have access to artillery and mortar support will often field dedicated spotter teams. Typically old soldiers who know about this sort of thing, they can turn the support fire into a deadly barrage. These chaps have to be brave though as any enemy worth their salt will be trying to ‘bag a spotter’.

Support team: Flamethrower
Flamethrowers are beastly weapons but they find their way onto the battlefield none-the-less.  Flamethrower teams inspire such fear and disgust in their enemy that they are likely to be targeted as soon as possible. 

Support team: Mortar
Mortar teams are fairly common, especially those armed with light mortars.  Units may have access to military grade mortars, but improvised versions are far more common, with simple steel tubes rigged up to fire ‘jam tin’ bombs. 

Support team: Field guns
Field guns are a relatively rare sight outside of the various military factions.   Those guns that are available are usually deployed in artillery support roles.  These precious weapons are often considered too precious to risk in close contact with the enemy.  Their most regular field use is in an anti-tank role or to bust an enemy bunker complex or similar hard point.  Field guns typically load either hi explosive shrapnel shells for anti-infantry fire, or an armour piercing shell for busting bunkers or taking out armour.

Support team: Fighting dogs
Fighting dog teams a formed from a dog handler and a pack of mastiffs or fighting dogs.  They are a fearsome close combat opponent and highly useful for digging defenders out of their foxholes.  The dogs are typically held on the leash until the team can get into range and then released on an unsuspecting enemy.

Logistics team: Supply Team
A Supply unit is a non-combatant unit of support troops and logistics specialists dedicated to keeping the fighting units well stocked with water, ammunition and other consumables.  Supply teams are essential if you’re planning to sustain your force’s effectiveness.

Logistics team: Medical Team
A Medical unit is a non-combatant unit of doctors, nurses, stretcher bearers and other medical crew dedicated to treating casualties and getting the lightly injured back into the fight. 



Vehicles

Movement
Vehicles can move along roads changing facing to follow that road as required.
A vehicle that moves 6” or less during any move can change facing as desired.
A vehicle that moves more than 6” can only change facing by up to 45° during their move. 

Wheeled vehicles
Wheeled vehicles cannot cross linear terrain.  They can only travel off-road on ground designated as good enough for wheeled vehicles.  This will be defined in a scenario or agreed by the players beforehand.

Tracked vehicles
Tracked vehicles can cross linear obstacles and any passable terrain (except dense woodland).  

Halfway across an obstacle, roll 1d6 for the vehicle.  On a ‘1’ the vehicle become bogged down or stuck and its movement ends.  The vehicle can attempt to move next turn as normal but suffers -2 BRV.  If the BRV test is successful the vehicle moves off from the obstacle without hindrance.

At the midpoint of its current move though area terrain, roll 1d6 for the vehicle.  On a ‘1’ the vehicle become bogged down or stuck and its movement ends.  The vehicle can attempt to move next turn as normal but suffers -2 BRV.  If the BRV test is successful the vehicle moves but will need to take another bog down’ test if its move continues through terrain.

Embarking and disembarking; Passengers can enter or leave a vehicle at any point during a move, provided that vehicle does not move more than 6” during the turn.  To embark, at least half the unit must be within 6” of the vehicle.  When disembarking, the unit is placed so that at least half of it remains within 6” of the vehicle.
Passengers on vehicles may use an un-crewed weapon mounted on the vehicle, but cannot otherwise shoot.

Vehicle ‘Bravery’; This represents the mechanical reliability of the vehicle as much as the bravery of the crew.  Low bravery vehicles are likely to be slow, difficult to manoeuvre or likely to stall, breakdown, skip gears, or otherwise have mobility problems.  High bravery vehicles are likely to be mechanically reliable.

Bravery extremes; A vehicle’s bravery test that rolls double 1 (before modifiers) allows the unit to move twice; these are two consecutive normal moves.  A vehicle that rolls double 6 (before modifiers) suffers a mechanical mishap; roll on the Vehicle Damage table with 1d6-1 to determine the effect.

Shooting
Armaments on vehicles have a 45° fire arc from the gun hull location, firing either forwards, to the left or right, or to the rear.   Turrets have a 360° fire arc (unless otherwise specified) measured from the turret center.  A vehicle may always choose to shoot at the closes visible enemy vehicle, ignoring other infantry.

Target priority; A vehicle must shoot at the closest enemy unit within 12” (or choose where two or more are equally close).  It may choose to ignore closer infantry to target the closest visible enemy vehicle, or clear anti-vehicle threat.  
A vehicle with more than one weapon may shoot each at different targets.
Otherwise a unit may shoot at any visible enemy target within arc and range.  A unit may not shoot at Medical or Supply team units if it has another enemy unit as a viable target.

Blocked line of sight; A Vehicle’s line of sight is measured from the centre edge of the facing being fired from, or the centre of the turret if the weapon is turret mounted.  It measures to any part/figure in the target unit.  This LOS is blocked if this LOS;

  • Passes within 1” of a friendly unit
  • Meets a linear obstacle or similar terrain (e.g. a hedge)
  • Passes through more than 3” of area terrain (e.g. a woodland)

Low on ammo; A vehicle weapon that makes a shooting attack and rolls more ‘1’s’ than successful hits becomes ‘low on ammo’ for that weapon.
A vehicle’s weapon that is low on ammo rolls half its Shooting dice (round down).  This applies to both soft and hard target dice for the weapon.
A vehicle weapon that suffers a second ‘low on ammo’ result can no longer shoot.

Vehicle Protection; Some vehicles have different armour protection on different facings.  A vehicle with a single PRO value uses that protection value all round.  Where the PRO values differ they are represented a Front / Sides / Rear, and correspond to the vehicle shooting arcs.  Indirect fire against a vehicle always counts as hitting the Rear armour. 

Melee
Vehicles never enter melee and are never locked in melee; they can interpenetrate any unit including enemies. 

Running people over; If a vehicle drives through (interpenetrates) an enemy unit during its move, that unit must test BRV.  The units BRV is reduced by the PRO value of the vehicle.  If the BRV test is failed, the unit loses 2 COH (which can be cancelled with LPs).  It counts this loss as if from melee.  The vehicle must not end ‘intermingled’ with the enemy unit.  If it remains within 3”, that enemy unit must attack the vehicle in melee if able to do so, and may do so even if the vehicle moved further than 6” during its move (see attacking a vehicle).

Attacking a vehicle; a unit may assault a vehicle (using their soft or hard target MELEE rating as appropriate) if they end within 3” of that vehicle and the vehicle did not move more than 6” during the turn.  Neither unit is locked in melee.  The vehicle does not fight back.  If the vehicle is not destroyed, an attacking unit then retreats from the combat.  

Vehicle Protection; An attacking unit uses the PRO of the facing attacked by the unit leader.  Open topped vehicles in melee always count as having PRO 2.

Vehicles ramming each other; If a vehicle rams another, both inflict damage on each other equal to their Protection rating.  E.g. two cars (PRO2) ram, and inflict 2 rolls on the Vehicle Damage Table.  If a soft vehicle is involved in a ram with a hard vehicle it counts its PRO as 1 lower.

Cohesion
Soft vehicles can be affected by anti-tank attack ratings, or normal attack ratings (at half that value (rounded down)
Hard vehicles can only be harmed by weapons with an anti-tank rating.  Small arms do no damage to them.
Vehicles do not have cohesion.  Instead every point of cohesion lost should be rolled on the vehicle damage table.

Vehicle Damage Table
1d6
1 or less Traction damage:  Vehicle can only move at half its listed rate for the rest of the battle.
2 Traction wrecked: Vehicle cannot move again for the rest of the battle.
3 Weapon damaged: One random weapon stops working for the rest of the battle.
4 Crew shaken: Crew are shaken up.  The vehicle cannot move this turn or shoot next turn.  Passengers cannot (dis)embark.
5 Wrecked: Vehicle is wrecked, the crew bails out (lost); passengers immediately disembark.
6 or more Brews up! Vehicle explodes killing crew/passengers and inflicting 1 COH loss on all units within 2d6”.  Soft vehicles within range roll once on the Vehicle damage chart; hard vehicles are unaffected.

Each result only applies once.  Subsequent repeat results are ignored.
Soft vehicles roll 1d6+1 for any Vehicle Damage rolled in response to a hit.
All vehicles roll 1d6-1 for any Vehicle Damage rolled in response to a Bravery roll of double 6.

Soft Vehicles
Crew
Passengers
MV
BRV
SHOOT
PRO
PTS
Notes
Draft vehicles








Cart
1
1+4
6”
7
-
2
1
-
Coach
1
1+4
12”
7
-
2
1
-
Wagon
1
1+10
6”
7
-
2
1
-
Limber
1
1
6”
7
-
2
1
Tow
Motor vehicles








Agricultural tractor
1
2
6”
7
-
2
1
Tow
Bike
1
-
24”
8
-
2
1
-
Car
1
3
24”
8
-
2
1
Tow
Lorry
1
2+20
12”
8
-
2
1
Tow
Omnibus
1
30
12”
8
-
2
1
Tow
Steam engine
2
2
6”
7
-
2
1
Tow
Truck
1
1+10
12”
8
-
2
1
Tow
Options








Armour plate
-
-
-
-
-
+1/+1/+1
+1
Poor turn
Mounted AT rifle
+1
-1
-
-
1(2)
-
+1
-
Mounted field gun
+3
-3
-2”
-
6(2)
-
+2
-
Mounted Flamethrower
+1
-1
-
-
8 (1) (12”)
-1
+1
-
Mounted LMG
+1
-1
-
-
4
-
+1
-
Mounted HMG
+1
-1
-
-
5 (1)
-
+2
-
Mounted Mortar
+2
-2
-
-
4(1): ≥12”
-
+1
Indirect


Hard Vehicles
Crew
Pass.
MV
BRV
Weapon
SHOOT
PRO
PTS
Notes
Armoured cars









Austin
4
-
24”
8
LMG (F,R,B)
4
3
3
Tow





LMG (F,L,B)
4



Lanchester 6x4
4
-
12”
9
LMG (F)
4
3
5
Tow





HMG (T+Co)
5 (1)



Putilov Kégress
4
-
12”
8
LMG (F,R,B)
4
3
3
Tow





LMG (F,L,B)
4



Rolls Royce
3
-
24”
8
LMG (T)
4
3
2
Tow
Sdkfz 221
2
-
24”
8
LMG (T)
4
3/3/2
2
Open, Tow
Sdkfz 221 mt 2.8cm
2
-
24”
8
Light gun (T+Co)
4 (2)
3/3/2
2
Open, Tow
Tankettes
Crew
Pass.
MV
BRV
Weapon
SHOOT
PRO
PTS
Notes
Carden-Lloyd
2
-
18”
8
LMG (F)
4
3/2/2
2
Open, Tow
CV-33 (Italian)
2
-
18”
7
LMG (F)
4
3
2
Tow
CV-35 (Italian)
2
-
18”
7
Flamethrower (F)
8 (1) (12”)
3/2/2
3
Tow
VA AT carrier
2
4
18”
8
AT Rifle (F)
1(2)
3
2
Open, Tow
VA MG carrier
2
4
18”
8
LMG (F)
4
3
2
Open, Tow
VA Mortar carrier
5
-
18”
8
Mortar (F)
4(1): ≥12”
3
3
Indirect, Open, Tow
VA universal carrier
1
1+4
18”
8
-
-
3
1
Open, Tow
Light tanks
Crew
Pass.
MV
BRV
Weapon
SHOOT
PRO
PTS
Notes
BT5 (Russian)
3
-
18”
8
Med. Gun (T+Co)
5 (3)
4/4/3
4
-
FT17 MG (French)
2
-
6”
8
LMG (T)
4
4
3
-
FT17 37mm (Fr.)
2
-
6”
8
Light gun (T)
3 (1)
4
3
-
Panzer I (German)
2
-
24”
7
2 linked LMGs (T)
6
3
4
-
Panzer II (German)
3
-
24”
8
Light gun (T+Co)
4 (2)
4/3/3
4
-
T26 (Russian)
3
-
18”
8
Med. Gun (T+Co)
5 (3)
4/3/3
4
-
Vickers E Type A
3
-
18”
8
HMG (F,L,B)
5 (1)
4
5
-





HMG (F,R,B)
5 (1)



Vickers E Type B
3
-
18”
8
Med. Gun (T+Co)
5 (3)
4
5
-
Medium tanks
Crew
Pass.
MV
BRV
Weapon
SHOOT
PRO
PTS
Notes
Char D1 (French)
3
-
18”
6
Med. Gun (T+Co)
5 (3)
5
5
-





LMG (F)
4



Mk.A ‘Whippet’
3
-
12”
6
LMG (TH)*
4
4
4
Poor turn
Vickers Mk.II
5
-
12”
8
Light gun (T)
1(2)
4/4/3
5
-





LMG (TH)*
4



Vickers Mk.III
7
-
18”
7
Med. Gun (T+Co)
5 (3)
4/4/3
6
-





LMG (F,L)
4








LMG (F,R)
4



Heavy tanks
Crew
Pass.
MV
BRV
Weapon
SHOOT
PRO
PTS
Notes
Mk.V Female
8
-
6”
6
LMG (F)
4
4/3/4
7
-





LMG (B)
4








2x LMG (L)
2x 4








2x LMG (R)
2x 4



Mk.V Male
8
-
6”
6
LMG (F)
4
4/3/4
9
-





LMG (B)
4








LMG (L, B)
4








LMG (R, B)
4








Heavy gun (L, F)
7 (3)








Heavy gun (R, F)
7 (3)



Mk.V Star
8
10
6”
6
LMG (F)
4
4/3/4
9
-





LMG (B)
4








Heavy gun (L, F)
7 (3)








Heavy gun (R, F)
7 (3)



Super-heavy tank
Crew
Pass.
MV
BRV
Weapon
SHOOT
PRO
PTS
Notes
Char 2C (French)
12
-
6”
6
Heavy gun (T)
7 (3)
6/5/5
10
-





LMG (F)
4








LMG (L)
4








LMG (R)
4








LMG (L, R, B)
4















‘LMG (TH)*’: denotes the arrangement of an LMG in each hull facing, but with limited crew capacity.  These machineguns therefore operate like a turret.

Tow: the vehicle can tow a trailer or field gun.

Poor Turn: The vehicle is exceptionally difficult for the driver to control, especially at speed.  If the vehicle moves 6” or less during any move it can change facing by up to 45°.  If the vehicle moves more than 6” it can only move directly forwards, even along roads.  

Open:  Open topped vehicles count their PRO as 2 when attacked by indirect shooting and Melee attacks.

Tank Commander:  Any Hard Vehicle can be designated a Commander unit for +3 points.  This unit acts as a Commander, can lead a force, distribute Leadership Points, etc.  Its vehicle statistics remain the same.  The vehicle should be modelled as a ‘commander’ with communications aerials, a banner or two, or a suitably impressive looking crewman leaning out of a hatch giving orders!

Weapon:  Some vehicles mount multiple weapons.  Each weapon that can shoot independently is listed with the firing arc it can attack into (F = front, L = left, R =right, B = back (rear), T = turret (all round)) 
Some main guns mount a coaxial MG (+Co).  This is fixed for ranging in the main gun, but can also be used to attack infantry instead of the main gun.

Damage: Hard vehicles are only vulnerable to anti-armour attacks (in brackets under melee or shoot).

Descriptions

Draft vehicles

Wagon/cart
The transport of choice since ancient times has been the horse or ox-drawn wagon or cart.  It remains in widespread use, even during the early years of the far cleaner and more efficient motor vehicle.  Particularly popular in rural areas.   They are typically open topped but may be canvas covered or even enclosed.  Wagons typically have four wheels whereas carts have two wheels.  This also includes the horse drawn coaches and buggies designed for passengers rather than goods.
Limber
A specialised horse or ox-drawn contraption designed to hook the beasts of burden to a field gun or similar load.
Motor vehicles

Car
Since the Benz "Velo" model (1894), the motor car has been the passenger transport of choice.  Fast, relatively reliable, and more comfortable than travelling in the back of a truck.  Most are powered by the internal combustion engine.
Truck
Motor trucks are light haulage vehicles designed primarily to carry goods.  They may be open topped, flatbed, or covered.
Lorry
Motor lorries are larger and designed to haul heavier loads than the smaller trucks.  Typically slow and cumbersome, they can also transport a good number of people, although not in much comfort.  Steam powered heavy haulage lorries continued in use alongside their diesel drivel cousins even as late as the 1950’s.
Omnibus
The first road-based mass transit system was the horse drawn omnibus.  This was quickly replaced by the motorised version.  It includes all manner of single and double decked arrangements as well as the charabanc.  Omnibuses are useful for transporting lots of people in relative comfort.
Agricultural tractor
The workhorse of the industrial revolution on the land, these are steam or diesel driven vehicles designed to roam off the roads and across the agricultural landscape with ease.  They’re also powerful beasts able to pull heavy trailer loads.
Steam engine
Huge, iron behemoths of the steam age.  Steam engines are powerful and versatile machines able to act as an agricultural or haulage vehicle, or to be used to power all manner of mechanically driven devices from threshing machines to belt-driven lathes.
Options

Armour plate
In difficult times, times of civil war or unrest, the need for armoured vehicles usually outstrips demand.  This doesn’t stop the enterprising tinkerers from welding on sheet iron or steel to their motor vehicles to try and lend some protection to the driver and crew.  Typically performance will suffer and the vehicle will be slow and difficult to control.
Mounted weapons
A simple motor car, truck, or even a horse drawn wagon (such as the Russian Tachanka) can be converted into a fighting vehicle by bolting on a machinegun.  The more ambitious jury rigger will bolt on something a bit more substantial to give his motor lorry a bit of punch.  Adding a mortar, flamethrower, or even a light field gun to a civilian vehicle makes for a highly effective mobile support weapon.
Armoured cars

Austin
Developed by the British during the early years of WWI (1915), the Austin armoured car was a rival to the Rolls Royce model.  Underpowered for its armour, it had various advantages over other models of the time.  It mounted two machinegun turrets, and was cheap and easy to manufacture.  The patent was licensed to the Russians who developed their own versions, and the Austin model saw great service during the Russian Civil War.
Rolls Royce
Developed by the British in 1914 and deployed mainly in the Middle East, the RRAC remained in service across the Empire and during the Irish Civil War until being retired early in WWII.  Built around the ‘Ghost’ chassis it was a fast, effective light armoured combat vehicle.
Lanchester 6x4
The British Lanchester 6x4 saw Imperial service from the 1920’s to the 1940’s.  Reliable and easy to maintain, they operated well off road and saw extensive service including during the Italian invasion of Abyssinia.
Putilov Kégress
Developed by the Russians during WWI as part of their armoured vehicle programme, the Putilov Kégress was an early attempt ad an armoured half tracked vehicle (the Kégress system).  It mounted two machineguns in a similar configuration to the British Lanchester 6x4, but suffered from problems of reliability.
Sdktz 221
This light armoured car was designed by the German army for reconnaissance duties.  the basic model mounted a turret light machine gun, although many were upgraded to include a 28mm cannon.
Tankettes

Carden-Lloyd tankette
This classic British tankette was the model on which all later tankettes were based.
VA universal carrier
The Vickers-Armstrong ‘universal carrier’ was developed in 1934 from the early Carden Lloyd tankette design.  Primarily designed to transport men and light support weapons, the VA UC is the most produced armoured fighting vehicle in history, with the design being produced up until 1960. 
VA MG carrier
Armed with a light machinegun, typically the excellent Bren gun, this turned the UC into an effective fire support vehicle.
VA AT carrier
Armed with Boys anti-tank rifle this gave the UC limited anti-vehicle capabilities, although he Boys was quickly outclassed during WWII by most tank armour.
VA Mortar carrier
Given its support role, the UC was soon upgraded with a light mortar, allowing the mortar support of a platoon to keep up with the troops.
CV-33 (Italian)
The Carro Veloce CV-33 or L3/33 was an Italian tankette that went into service in 1933.  It was designed as a light infantry support vehicle and armed with a 6.5mm light machinegun.  
CV-35 (Italian)
The Carro Veloce CV-35 was a C33 with the LMG replaced by a flamethrower.  It towed the fuel in a rear bowser.  

Light tanks

Vickers E Type A
The British Vickers Type E was produced in 1928 as a light tank, but was rejected by the British army due to concerns over its suspension.  However, the model was sold to many countries around the world, including the Russians who used it as inspiration for their T26 tank.  The Type A variant mounted two light machinegun turrets.
Vickers E Type B
The Vickers Type B replaced the two machinegun turrets with a single two-man turret mounting a coaxial light machinegun and a 47mm cannon.
Panzer I (German)
Produced by German in 1934, the Panzer I was introduced as a ‘training tank’ to circumvent the military restrictions on Germany at the time.  It saw active service in the Spanish Civil War, and was used by the Germans during WWII.  Thinly armoured and mounting two twin-linked MG13’s its role was limited to light infantry support.  It was also mechanically unreliable and had a suspension with an alarming tendency to ‘wallow’ if turning at high speed.
Panzer II (German)
The Panzer II was developed in response to the experiences of the Panzer I design in Spain.  The Panzer II had better armour, improved mechanical reliability, and a 20mm cannon.
T26 (Russian)
Produced by the Russians in 1931, the T26 was based on the British Vickers light tank.  It significantly improved on this design however and was widely considered to be the best tank in service during the 1930’s.  Exported to many countries, it was the primary armoured fighting vehicle of the Spanish civil War.
BT5 (Russian)
Produced by Russia between 1932 and 1945, the BT5 ‘cavalry tank’ was the forerunner of the feared T34.  It was a fast and highly effective armoured vehicle that first saw service during the Spanish Civil War.
FT17 MG or 37mm
The Renault FT17 was developed in 1917 and represented a significant leap forwards in armoured vehicle design.  It incorporated the first fully rotating turret fitted with either a 7.92mm machinegun or a 37mm cannon.  The FT17 saw extensive service in WWI and the interwar period, and although by then obsolete they were even used during WWII. 
Medium tanks

Vickers Mk.II
The British Vickers Medium Mk.II was in service from 1925 to 1939.  It was a transitional design with both fixed hull machineguns and a fully rotating turret.  It was slow, underpowered and unreliable.
Vickers Mk.III
The Vickers Mk.III was an experimental design commissioned to replace the Mk.II.  It had an unusual configuration with limited-traverse hull turrets and a fully rotating top turret.  Heavy, cumbersome, and requiring a large crew, very few were ever built and it never entered service.
Mk.A ‘Whippet’
The British Medium Mk.A ‘Whippet’ was a WWI era ‘light’ tank designed to complement the heavier rhomboid models and rush forwards to exploit breaches in the German defence lines.  It was slow and cumbersome none-the-less and was designed for anti-infantry work.  Each facing had a hull-mounted machinegun, but with too few crew inside they had to ‘hop about’ to man each gun where required.
Char D1 (French)
Produced between 1931 and 1935, the French Char D1 was developed as a ‘light infantry support tank’.  It was never used in this role though and its extreme mechanical unreliability saw it phased out during the interwar period.
Heavy tanks

Mk.V Male / Female
Since the development of the world’s first combat tank, the British had been frantically improving the design, mainly to resolve the reliability problems.  The Mk.V was issued to service in December 1917 and provided many of those improvements.  The ‘male’ version had two 6pdr cannons in its side sponsors, whereas the ‘female’ was armed exclusively with machineguns. The iconic rhomboid tanks were designed for breaching trench systems and were mechanically unreliable at best.
Mk.V Star
The Mk.V ‘Star’ had a longer chassis to incorporate a passenger section, allowing the tank to transport a unit of 10 soldiers into a battle.
Super-heavy tank

Char 2C (French)
Produced by the French in 1921, the Char 2C is the largest production tank ever.  Only a few were ever built.